Snow news is good news

I get a little twitchy when it snows this hard, but studio time and good news are helping me forget the worst of Snowmageddon 2019.

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Just found out I made the cut for the upcoming group exhibit at CoCA Seattle! Artists submitted more than 1300 works for the “Motherland” show; juror Amanda Manitach winnowed it down to 121 pieces. So next month, “St. Felicia, Slayer of Fools” will hang in CoCA’s gallery space.

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I’m especially pleased about that last bit. Some pieces in the “Motherland” exhibit will be viewable online only. I think sculpture in general — and assemblage in particular — makes more sense visually when you can see it in person.

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You know that Twyla Tharp quote about running away without actually leaving home? Yeah, that was me, holing up in the studio during my kids’ seemingly-endless snow days. The result: a new collage that’s been nudging me for the past couple months.

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I was going to call it “A Friend in Me” but I may change the title to “Friendship, Served Blue-Rare.” (More on that in another post.) And despite the slippery roads, I made it through the snow to deliver work to Ghost Gallery for this month’s “Art of Tarot III” exhibit.

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Apparently it all worked out in the end, but don’t worry; this hasn’t changed me. I will continue to complain loudly about the snow no matter how much it benefits my art practice.

In my studio: Black history, black futures

Dear America:

I’m gonna need you to up your history game to include the stories of all our people, and not just in history books. (But really: you need to do better with schoolchildren’s history books. Those things are awful.) You don’t even have to look far for material. For example: Did you even know you owned this photo, America?

Children at a White House Easter egg roll, 1923. Credit: Library of Congress

Children at a White House Easter egg roll, 1923. Credit: Library of Congress

It’s in the Library of Congress, that big ol’ hoard of your favorite images and documents. I laughed out loud when I first discovered the image — I mean, that’s some EPIC (probably unintentional) side-eye!

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And then I sighed. This photo and its original title — “A study in black and white snaped [sic] at the White House today” — say everything and nothing at all about America in 1923. Like a lot of American history and culture. A wink-wink-nudge-nudge title that implies racial tension, and almost no explanation for why that might be so.

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During Black History/Black Futures Month, I’m going to assign my own interpretation of what’s going on in this photo. I think the gaps in our stories are directly responsible for the way we treat each other. Realistically, I know those gaping holes will continue to exist for… God only knows how long. But if anyone else is trying to fill the holes and make things right, well, the collages I plan to make are for you.

"... Mother" returns next week

It’s like Homecoming Week up in here: “Like Mother” opens its doors in North Seattle next Wednesday, this time at the North Seattle College art gallery.

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Notice there are two opportunities for you to see our work that day! If your schedule allows, you can join us that afternoon. If not, then join us in the early evening and wait out rush hour looking at art instead of sitting in traffic. I promise, it’s far more pleasant to breathe in the sweet smell of beeswax from Deborah Kapoor’s encaustic art installation.

Deborah Kapoor, “My Body, My Home”

Deborah Kapoor, “My Body, My Home”

Maybe you have to head home right away, though; I understand. Rest up on Friday, then join me Saturday evening in Shoreline for the opening of “Living the Dream.”

Lisa Myers Bulmash, “Relatively Progressive” (detail)

Lisa Myers Bulmash, “Relatively Progressive” (detail)

Photo of Edwin T. Pratt. Credit: Black Heritage Society of WA state

Photo of Edwin T. Pratt. Credit: Black Heritage Society of WA state

Hope to see you soon — maybe at both events!