art installation

Three things you don't do at the Seattle Art Fair

Let’s pretend you’re more interested in the air conditioning than the art at the Seattle Art Fair. Here’s a quick etiquette lesson on three things you just… don’t… do… before you get in the door.

1. Don’t talk smack about the art. They can hear you.

Holly Ballard Martz, “Danger of Nostalgia in Wallpaper Form (in utero),” at ZINC Contemporary

Holly Ballard Martz, “Danger of Nostalgia in Wallpaper Form (in utero),” at ZINC Contemporary

Overheard at preview night, about Holly Ballard Martz’s stunning work: “It’s really abortion-y.”

Wow. That was all you got out of this installation of wire hangers, each bent by hand into the shape of a uterus? If you don’t get it, why not ask about the art? That’s what the gallery staff — and the artist — are there for, to talk to you. P.S. Holly’s less ‘abortion-y’ pieces are on the other side of the wall.

2. Don’t touch — not with your hands, butt or shoulder.

Bigert & Bergström, “Incubator for Earthquakes” (provided by the artists)

Bigert & Bergström, “Incubator for Earthquakes” (provided by the artists)

This is not a children’s museum where you get to play with the exhibits. Don’t touch the art. Even if you intend to buy it. No leaning on the booth walls, either. If you need to sit, use one of the padded benches outside the booth. (While I’m at it: Don’t touch the art in art museums, either. Slow down and breathe deeply until the urge passes.)

3. Don’t hold back on the shine.

LMB-Lisa Kokin Seager Gray duo - Copy.jpg

Wanna show your followers how amaaaaazing the art is? Go for it — and remember to tag the artist AND the gallery presenting the work. You don’t even have to type in names: take a photo of the wall text identifying the piece and post that too. This one simple action shows you know something about the art world, and you’re not just some rando who’s there for the air conditioning. Bonus: you remember the artwork better when you write something about it. Extra credit bonus: other people get to check out the artist and gallery if they like the work.

LMB-Seattle Art Fair 2019 exterior.jpg

One last thing: there will be selfie-bait. Before you take the picture, check your surroundings so you don’t back into the rest of the art. You don’t want to be that person, do you?

Safety zones, in black and white

Can I just tell you how cool it is to do a collaborative piece of art... with people you haven't even met yet? I heart you, mystery chalkboard writers.

safety zone collage.jpg

Inside the You're Not From Around Here, Are You? exhibit, you literally have permission to write on (part of) the wall. For this art installation, I'd like you to share your personal safe space... and if that doesn't exist around here, I'd like you to share a specific place you don't feel safe.

20171115_102526 - Copy.jpg

Loving the results so far... here's a few to check out.

From Patricia A.: "People say so many negative things about my hometown, White Center, but I love our diversity and being unincorporated! Being multiethnic, I feel safe in diverse cities."

From Patricia A.: "People say so many negative things about my hometown, White Center, but I love our diversity and being unincorporated! Being multiethnic, I feel safe in diverse cities."

Anonymous comment: "I am from Balto., MD. Have lived in Seattle for 20+ years. I do not feel safe anywhere. As a black woman "feeling" safe is a luxury I can't afford. One must always be on her guard."

Anonymous comment: "I am from Balto., MD. Have lived in Seattle for 20+ years. I do not feel safe anywhere. As a black woman "feeling" safe is a luxury I can't afford. One must always be on her guard."

Anonymous comment: "Born in Yakima moved to Seattle in 1950 in the CD moved back in 2010."

Anonymous comment: "Born in Yakima moved to Seattle in 1950 in the CD moved back in 2010."

If you can join us on the weekend of December 16th and 17th, you can make your own contribution to this art installation! Please let us know you'll be attending the artist-led tour that  day; RSVP on the Facebook Event page. Hope to see your thoughts on the wall soon, in black & white.

Bloomers and water towers

In today's episode of My Twisty Little Mind: I'm thinking about water towers. And bloomers.

Artist Maura Donegan holds up pants-turned-into-bloomers. Credit: Mary Coss

Artist Maura Donegan holds up pants-turned-into-bloomers. Credit: Mary Coss

The bloomers are part of a Victorian-era costume for the "Public Debt to the Suffragette" chalk art installation. At the Pacific NW Chalk FestMary Coss will gather a group of artists to create a tribute to those who fought for the right to vote.

I'll be at the booth on August 19th.  Before and after that, though, I'll be holed up in the studio.

I've developed a thing for water towers. Not in a Jeff Foxworthy, defend-your-sister's-honor kind of way... they symbolize other, deeper things to me. And with that cliffhanger, I'll leave you until the next post... [chuckling evilly]